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INGREDIENTS: You care about what you feed you pet, and so do we, so we want to tell you what is in our treats and some of the benefits from them.  

Whole Wheat Flour,

100% Rolled Oats,

Rice Cereal, Sweet Potato Starch, Tapioca Starch

Bacon

Fresh ground Ham,

Fresh ground Beef,

Fresh roasted Turkey (no skin, fat, or bones),

Fresh grated cheeses (Parmesan, Swiss, Cheddar),

Eggs,

Vegetable Oil,

Powdered Milk,

Fresh garlic (good for the skin, helps repel fleas and aid digestion),

NOTE: We often get questions about whether or not garlic is safe for dogs.  Here's an excellent article on the subject..  http://www.natural-dog-health-remedies.com/garlic-for-dogs.html

Fresh Chopped Parsley (will take care of the breath!),

Baby Food

Pumpkin (Great for Dogs and Humans!) Pumpkin is loaded with Beta carotene and anti-oxidants especially Vitamin C and E. These vitamins help to lower cancer risk, cataracts and heart disease.

Bananas, Blueberries. Apples (never the seeds) or Natural Applesauce,

Peanuts or Peanut butter,Honey, Carob

Cinnamon (Besides Being Yummy, Has Many Health Benefits) · Anti-inflammatory qualities help with painful joints and arthritis · Helps regulate blood sugar (good for diabetics) · Improves circulation (good for the heart) · Can help improve digestion and relieve upset tummies · May help lower triglyceride and cholesterol levels · Is a natural food preservative so your treats last longer.   You may want to consider regular doses of cinnamon to your diet as well!

 

WARNING!!! Through many years of dog ownership I've learned what is good and bad for my canine companions. Some of the most surprising discoveries come in the form of people food. We all know not to feed table scraps, but did you know that some fairly common people food could be dangerous and potentially lethal to your dog.  It's become evident that a large number of people are unaware of these foods so I've compiled a list in hopes of educating fellow dog owners.

Xylitol is perfectly safe for people, but because of different metabolisms, it can be fatal for dogs and cats. A simple piece of cupcake or cookie could kill an animal if the danger is unknown and not addressed immediately.

CHOCOLATE: Best to remember dark chocolate, especially baker's chocolate, is the worst when it comes to this type of poisoning. Chocolate contains a substance called Theobromine (similar to caffeine), which in toxic doses can cause heart attacks. As little as 2 oz baker's chocolate can be fatal for a small dog. If you suspect your dog has gotten into chocolate call your vet immediately.

GRAPES/RAISINS: Surprisingly, this is a toxic fruit for dogs. They contain an unknown toxin, which can cause acute renal (kidney) failure. As little as a handful at a time can be deadly.

ONIONS: A substance in onions, disulfide, is harmless to humans but toxic to not only dogs but cats, horses, sheep and cattle. It causes hemolytic anemia, and as little as 2 slices a week can damage red blood cells, impairing their ability to carry oxygen.

LIVER: In small amounts liver is very good for your dog (less than 3 servings a week). Large amounts cause vitamin A toxicity (hypervitaminosis A). This can lead to bone problems, weight loss and anorexia. Also, never feed liver if your dog is taking vitamin A supplements, and always cook it before feeding.

BONES: Sterilized bones that are purchased aren't the problem. Raw meaty bones and chicken bones are prone to splinter and lodge in the throat, or worse, the intestines, in which case they can perforate the lining causing internal bleeding and possibly death. This doesn't mean no bones, ask the butcher for soup bones, bring water to a full boil then cook the bones for approximately 20 minutes (depending on size). NOTE: The first time I did this I removed much, not all, of the fat and meat from the outside of the bone. My dog's stomachs weren't used to such a treat and I didn't want to cause diarrhea. However, I did save the scraps and fed them on their food at a later date.

RAW EGGS: Cooked eggs are a very healthy treat for dogs, raw egg whites contain a protein called Avidin. This protein depletes your dog of B vitamins, specifically Biotin, which is essential to growth and coat condition. Also, raw eggs may contain bacteria, such as Salmonella.

RAW MEAT/POULTRY: Once again bacteria are the main problem, Salmonella and Clostridium, both can be very serious and costly to treat. Just remember, if you feed meat, cook it first. NOTE: Best to avoid pork, especially bacon (which contains sodium nitrate).

NUTS: Walnuts can cause gastroenteritis and are considered poisonous to dogs. Macadamia nuts contain an unknown compound, which can cause muscle tremors, weakness and paralysis of the hindquarters (luckily these symptoms last a short time). In general, nuts are high in phosphorus and may contribute to the formation of bladder stones. NOTE: Peanuts are a legume, from the earth, not grown on trees. They are not harmful when used in small amounts.

POTATO: Cooked and mashed potatoes are good for dogs. However, poisonous alkaloids (Solanum) are present in green sprouts and green potato skins. NOTE: Poisonings occur in people as well as dogs!

TOMATO PLANTS: Stems and leaves contain oxalates, which can cause bladder stones. NOTE: The fruit itself is not the culprit, however high amounts of vitamin C can cause gastrointestinal distress.

RHUBARB: This plant (especially the leaves) also contains oxalates.

TURKEY SKIN: Known to cause acute Pancreatitis in dogs.

PIPS: Found in the seeds of apples, pears, plums, peaches and apricots, ALL CONTAIN ARSENIC!

NUTMEG: Is a hallucinogen in dogs.

MUSHROOMS: In all honesty, any wild growing mushroom scares me, and if my dogs are anywhere near some, I go the other way, you just don't know. Store bought mushrooms are fine, but do you really want your dog to develop a taste for them?